An Uninvited Guest

Last night, when Kevin got Katelynn’s bike in the garage, he saw something trying to get into the house. He looked closer, and by the time the door closed, it pulled its head back. He called me outside, and said: “Be careful, there is a snake in the corner!” I asked, how big it was. And he replied: “It’s small. More the size of a baby snake.” After I looked at it, I got my camera, and captured some pictures to put it in a group, which has snake experts. Kevin got a shuffle and a tray to put the snake back in the grass, where it slit away in the dark.

I went online and found out, it is a Texas brown snake; a harmless snake, that feeds of slugs, snails, and bugs. It’s very good to have it around, since we have a lot of slugs due to all this rain. I don’t mind them outside. But I definitely don’t want a snake inside the house.

This young female Texas Brown snake tried to get into our house last night.

This young female Texas brown snake tried to get into our house last night.

Eight Legs Of Cuteness

Today, it is warm. And the insect love to hang out in my garden. This is a good time for this little jumping spider, to catch itself a meal. While it was climbing up my butterfly weed, I could get a hold of it in front of my lens. I always love, when a jumping spider “poses” for me. So did this one.❤

"Hello! How are you? You must be the human, who planted this wonderful garden for us?"

“Hello! How are you? You must be the human, who planted this wonderful garden for us?”

The Bushy-tailed Visitor

Sara was watching the birds and other critters eating food from the bird feeder and what the birds dropped down on the porch. The squirrel came for a brunch as well. And Sara told me, that the squirrel is sitting out there and waiting for some peanuts. I grabbed a hand full of critter food and brought it outside. The squirrel watched me from a safe distance on a fence pole. When I got inside, it looked around before it came to eat some seeds, corn, and nuts.

The squirrel poses for a picture on top of the dog house.

The squirrel poses for a picture on top of the dog house.

"Hello! Thank you for the food you are providing me!"

“Hello! Thank you for the food you are providing me!”

Lewisville Lake Spillway

The moment is finally here: The water of Lewisville Lake goes over the spillway for the last few hours. Since Lake Ray Roberts is releasing 600 cubic more water per second out of its gate (7000 cubic/sec.) than the gate (6400 cubic/sec.) does at Lewisville Lake, plus the recent rain falls of the last couple of days, it was only a matter of a fact, before the last foot of the 532-feet mark was reached to make the lake spill over. Now all this water, which flows over the spillway, establishes a creek of its own designed to flow into the Elm Fork Trinity River south of the lake dam.

It helps to release some of the water, which comes dangerously close to the homes near the lakes. More rainfalls are also in the forecast. Let’s hope the lakes are not rising too much higher as their current levels.

At the time I captured the photo, the water was going over the spillway for about two hours.

At the time I captured the photo, the water was going over the spillway for about two hours.

All the precious water water from the lake goes over the spillway  into a creek, which flows into the Elm Fork River south of the lake dam.

All the precious water from Lewisville Lake goes over the spillway into a creek, which flows into the Elm Fork Trinity River south of the lake dam.

Remember The Fallen

Perfectly for the Memorial Day weekend I could pick a red poppy out of my green house. Earlier this week I learned something very interesting. I was always wondering, why poppies would be brought up with the Memorial Day remembrance. And here is the answer:

The red poppy grew profusely on the World War I war zone of Flanders Field along the coast of Belgium and France. Poppies blanketed the battlefields with a sea of red, and so have come to symbolize the blood that was shed there. With 368 WWI U.S. soldiers buried in Flanders Field cemetery, the red poppy, or the Flanders poppy as it is now often called become a symbol of wartime remembrance. (Resource: Botanical Interests)

It might not be a Flanders Poppy, but it's a red poppy out of my green house. It's the thought, that counts.

It might not be a Flanders Poppy, but it’s a red poppy out of my green house. It’s the thought, that counts.